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"The best observing practice is to adopt a star and stick to it - *density of observation* is very critical.  Until you don't like it any more - then adopt a different star!" --Joe Patterson (Columbia University, CBA boss)

Our first observing priority are accreting white dwarfs which have been observed to host classical nova explosions. As Joe Patterson said on 2016 Apr 25, A word about this project - the long-term "old nova project". We'd like to track the evolution of nova orbital light curves, over the first few decades after outburst. The most interesting interval is the first few years, so even very recent novae (say 1-3 years) are eligible. Most novae flash orbital light curves, and most show a very characteristic light curve, suggesting heating of the secondary - a double-sinusoid with an apparent eclipse. In theory, the evolution of the "eclipse" and the double wave allows deduction of the changing pattern of heating in the binary... and that might even allow us to track the cooling of the white dwarf, decades after eruption.

Last updated by Kirill Sokolovsky on 2019 February 18.

Exoplanets Edit

KELT Transit Finder- There won't be set comparison stars for these. Just choose 3 stars in your field that have similar brightness as your target star, and note their x/y positions. Try get an hour before and/or after the transit, and make sure to make a finder chart of your field.

Microlensing events Edit

Gaia18dmf: 19:41:56.25 +34:24:52.4

  • Use the Aladin Sky Atlas[1] to make a finder chart (copy the above coordinates to its command line)
  • This is a faint 18mag microlensing event, a long (10 min?) exposure is need. The goal is to reach SNR>20 (as reported by MaxIm) on source (corresponds to photometry error <0.05mag). If the SNR cannot be reached for an individual image, please take multiple images in one filter, so I'll try to stack them
  • One/two images in V and R bands/night would be ideal
  • Gaia transient alert for this target [2]

ASASSN-19cq: 17:47:05.88 -13:31:42.0

  • Use the Aladin Sky Atlas[3] to make a finder chart (copy the above coordinates to its command line)
  • This is a bright 14mag microlensing event
  • One/two images in each of the BVR plus a time series in g (or V or R if there are no g-band flats) are needed for this target
  • Our ATel reporting the discovery [4]

Gaia18dvy: 20:05:06.02š š36:29:13.52, G=16.2mag

Please slack Kirill Sokolovsky if you manage to observe any of the above targets, so I'll run the analysis.

Binaries and Cataclysmic Variables Edit

CSSJ0458: 04:58:39.6 +35:05:43

  • Use the Aladin Sky Atlas[6] to make a finder chart (copy the above coordinates to its command line)
  • This is a yet-unpublished VY Scl-type cataclysmic variable (16mag)
  • One/two images in V and R bands/night would be ideal

Gaia16bnz: 03:40:17.98 +49:21:32.1

  • Use the Aladin Sky Atlas[7] to make a finder chart (copy the above coordinates to its command line)
  • This is a VY Scl-type cataclysmic variable (13mag) that is incorrectly reported in VSX as a young stellar object (UXOR) [8]
  • One/two images in V and R bands/night would be ideal
  • Gaia transient alert for this target [9]

Please slack Kirill Sokolovsky if you manage to observe any of the above two targets, so I'll run the analysis.

CBA long time series targets:

BH Lyn: 08:22:36.11 +51:05:25.0 (13.7 - 16.3)

AM CVn: 12:34:54.62 +37:37:44.1 (14.0 - 14.4)

DW Cnc: 07:58:53.11 +16:16:45.4 (11.36 - 17.5 V)

  • Use the Aladin Sky Atlas[10] to find the target
  • A long time series in Clear is required
  • Use the AAVSO chart generator to find suitable comparison stars and follow the analysis instructions to perform photometry and send it to the CBA

CBA monitoring of polars (magnetic CVs) for triggering X-ray observations if a polar is in a high state:

VV Pup 08:15:06.79 -19:03:17.7 (13.9 - 19.6 V)

ST LMi 11:05:39.77 +25:06:28.6 (14.4 - 18.5 V)

V2301 Oph 18:00:35.53 +08:10:13.9 (14.7 - 22.0 V)

EP Dra 19:07:06.16 +69:08:44.0 (17.6 - <21.0 V)

  • Use the Aladin Sky Atlas[11] to find the target
  • If the target is so faint that you don't see it - make a V-band image (to get an upper limit) and move on to the next one
  • A long time series in V or Clear is preferred, if not possible - individual observations are also useful
  • Use the AAVSO chart generator to find suitable comparison stars and follow the analysis instructions to perform photometry and send it to the CBA
  • A prompt analysis (same night/next day) is essential. Ask for help if you can't do the photometric analysis on your own.

Targets inherited from the fall 2018 season:

V959 Mon: RA = 06 39 38.74, Dec = +05 53 52.0 Edit

  • Finder chart
  • Nova that exploded in 2012 that is near and dear to Laura's heart
  • This one is pretty faint, ~17.3 mag. You might need to do few minute exposures in clear filter, and probably need decent seeing. If you decide it's REALLY too faint and not doable after trying, please make a comment here so we can officially retire it.

V1062 Tau: RA= 05:02:27.47, Dec= +24:45:23.3 Edit

Nova Outbursts Edit

Nova V392 Per: RA=04:43:21.37, Dec=+47:21:25.9 Edit

  • Finder chart
  • Please get nice B, V, R, I exposures (say, just three exposures in each filter) every night you observe and the source is visible in the sky (it's probably mostly set for summer 2018, but should be visible again in late 2018). You don't need to sit on this one for monitoring sequences.
  • Don't need to submit to CBA; these are for Laura! Send to chomiuk-AT-pa.msu.edu instead

Nova ASASSN-17hx: RA=18:31:45.918, Dec= -14:18:55.57 Edit

  • PLEASE still observe this, in Summer 2018!!! This source is still bright, at V~12.5 mag, and other folks aren't observing it!
  • Finder chart
  • Please get nice B, V, R, I exposures (say, just three exposures in each filter) every night you observe and the source is visible in the sky. You don't need to sit on this one for monitoring sequences.
  • Comparison Star: 127
  • Check Star 1: 134
  • Check Star 2: 120
  • Don't need to submit to CBA; these are for Laura! Send to chomiuk-AT-pa.msu.edu instead

Retired (at least presently): Edit

FS Aur: 05:47:48.36, +28:35:11.2

Paloma=RX J0524+4244: 05:24:30.44, +42:44:50.8

DW Cnc: 07:58:53.07, +16:16:45.4

  • Finder chart
  • More info on Koji's intermediate polar (IP) page
  • 1.4 hour orbital period; 39 minute white dwarf spin period.
  • "DQ Her"-like, or an intermediate polar. So the white dwarf has a pretty strong magnetic field.
  • Should be in the range 15--17.5 mag. So either V band or clear monitoring may work; if you have opinions on which is better, report back!

YZ CNC: 08:10:56.65, +28:08:33.2

  • Finder chart
  • Variable Type: SU UMa type dwarf nova
  • Campaign Timeframe: ongoing
  • Filter to use: V
  • Exposure Length: not specified
  • Orbital Period: 2.08 hours
  • Outburst Period: 7-10 days
  • Superoutburst Period: 100-110 days
  • Quiescence Magnitude: 14.8
  • Outburst Max Magnitude: 12.0
  • Superoutburst Max Magnitude: 11.0

CR Boo: 13:48:55.22, +07:57:35.8

  • Variable Type: AM CVn type dwarf nova
  • Campaign Timeframe: ongoing
  • Filter to use: Clear
  • Exposure Length: not specified
  • Quiescence Magnitude: ~15.0

OV Boo: 15:07:22.35, +52:30:39.8

ES Dra: 15:25:31.81, +62:01:00.0

  • Variable Type: Z Cam dwarf nova
  • Campaign Timeframe: ongoing
  • Filter to use: V (Clear if too dim)
  • Exposure Length: not specified
  • Period: 4.2 hours
  • Quiescence Magnitude: 15.4
  • Negative Superhump Magnitude: 17.0
  • Finder chart

IGR J19552+0044: 19 55 12.47 +00 45 36.6

  • Finder chart
  • Short exposures (as short as possible!)
  • Comparison Stars: 148, 145, 158

V2306 Cyg: 19 58 14.46 +32 32 42.4

Nova V339 Del: RA= 20 23 30.73  Dec= +20 46 04.1

  • This is a nova that went off in 2013 that is still optically bright, at V ~ 14.5 mag. We want to monitor it to see if we can find the binary period.
  • Observe this one in V band for long time series.
  • Finder chart

V2069 Cyg: 21 23 44.83 +42 18 01.6

V598 Peg = RX233325.92+152222: 23:33:25.99, +15:22:22.2

FY Per: RA= 04 41 56.60, Dec= +50 42 36.0

  • FY Per is a total mystery star. A well-determined spectroscopic period of 0.2585 d, but every so often, a 90-minute photometric period pops up just a few hundredths of a magnitude, but not particularly difficult to study since the star is 12th mag. One of these years, we should figure it out!
  • Finder chart
  • Nice long sequences on this guy, preferably in V filter.
  • Comparison stars: 136 V: 13.612, 135 V: 13.478, 143 V: 14.34

FO Aqr: 22:17:55.38, -08:21:03.8

  • Use a 'clear' filter and take short exposure (<60 seconds), as you are trying to resolve an 11 minute period

BY Cam: RA = 05 42 48.80, Dec = +60 51 31.4 Edit

  • Finder Chart
  • Comparison Stars (In Order): 130 V: 12.969, 148 V:14.789, 134 V:13.392
  • Filter: Clear

DQ Her: RA = 18 07 30.3, Dec = +45 51 33

  • Filter: Clear

AM CVn: RA = 12:34:54.62, Dec = +37:37:44.1

  • Finder Chart
  • Comparison Stars (In Order): 144, 157, 125
  • Filter: Clear
  • Magnitude: 14-14.5

HP Lib: RA=15:35:53.07, Dec = -14:13:12.2

  • He-rich cataclysmic variable, should be around 13.5 mag
  • Finder chart

SDSS J141118.31+481257.6: RA= 14:11:18.32, Dec= +48:12:57.5

  • This AM CVn-type variable is currently undergoing its first recorded outburst (12.6 mag, detected by Tadashi Kojima on 2018 May 19.514 UT). Time-resolved photometry is urgently required.
  • comp star 1: 127
  • comp star 2: 139

ASASSN-18ey: RA= 18:20:21.95, Dec=+07:11:07.3

  • HIGH PRIORITY SUMMER 2018
  • New X-ray transient, with powerful super humps
  • Joe Patterson recommends using V filter
  • recommend longer exposures
  • Finder chart
  • Use comparison stars: 146, 128, 143

V1974 Cyg: 20:30:31.61, +52:37:51.3

  • Finder chart
  • Use comparison stars 139, 142, 146
  • Filter to use: Clear

AO Psc: RA= 22:55:17.896, Dec= -03:10:39.98

  • Finder Chart
  • Use comparison stars: 97, 114, 143
  • Filter to use: Clear

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